October 30, 2012

v a v a v e l v e t . .

yes this has been a long time love affair.
everything velvet, velvet, velvet... lush, rich, bold.
certainly one of our most favourite velvet affairs is with furniture! there is something old world, bordeux, vintage and elegant about velvet furnishings...

Velvet is a type of woven tufted fabric in which the cut threads are evenly distributed, with a short dense pile, giving it a distinctive feel.
The word 'velvety' is used as an adjective to mean "smooth like velvet". Velvet can be either synthetic or natural.
types of velvet:
  • Crushed: This type of velvet can be produced by pressing the fabric down in different directions. It can also be produced by mechanically twisting the fabric while wet. The result is patterned appearance that is very lustrous.
  • Devore: This variety is produced with a caustic solution. This dissolves part of the velvet leaving sheer areas of fabric. Usually a definite pattern is produced.
  • Embossed: A metal roller is used to heat-stamp the fabric, producing a pattern.
  • Hammered: This type is extremely lustrous, appears dappled, and somewhat crushed.
  • PannĂ©: Also a type of crushed velvet, pannĂ© is produced by forcing the pile in a single direction by applying heavy pressure.
  • Plain: Commonly made of cotton, this type of velvet has a firm hand and can be used for many purposes.
  • Silk: More expensive than plain velvet, this type is usually shinier and softer than the cotton variety.
  • Viscose: In terms of quality, this type is more similar to silk velvet than cotton velvet.
  • Velveteen is a type of imitation velvet. It is normally made of cotton or a combination of cotton and silk. It has a pile that is short (never more than 3mm deep), and is closely set. It has a firm hand, and a slightly sloping pile. Unlike true velvet, this type has greater body, does not drape as easily, and has less sheen. via